Visual Merchandiser Job Description Every retail store enlists the help of a visual merchandiser to help them determine the best layout for displaying their products. Doing so enhances sales and profits, and there are many people for whom visual merchandising is an ideal field.

You're introduced to the principles, philosophies and technologies of visual merchandising through first-hand exploration and hands-on classroom experimentation. The types of employers most likely to recruit visual merchandisers include:

The majority of visual merchandising personnel are employed in retail stores, the lowest level being assistant visual merchandiser and the highest being visual merchandising, employing a staff of 50+ in a large organisation.
Job Description Visual merchandisers are in charge of creating attractive visual displays in retail outlets. These guys make shops look the way they do, using their creativity to enhance the aesthetic appeal of window displays, walkways, counters and in-store displays.
Visual merchandiser: Job description and activities A visual merchandiser creates window and in-store displays in shops and department stores, taking responsibility for ‘the look’ of the store, with the aim of promoting goods in order to maximise sales.
Use this Visual Merchandising Associate job description to discover the responsibilities, qualifications, education, requirements and salary details about this position and what makes it such a .
Visual Merchandiser. Job Description: Visual merchandisers conceive and implement creative product displays and other visual elements in a retail store. Their goal is to establish a distinctive atmosphere and aesthetic to drive customers’ in-store purchase decisions. Relying on their imagination and design know-how, visual merchandisers may.
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Use this Visual Merchandising Associate job description to discover the responsibilities, qualifications, education, requirements and salary details about this position and what makes it such a .

The Fashion Retail Academy offers a Level 4 Diploma in visual merchandising, which includes a work placement. Some further education FE providers offer extremely practical courses that focus on retail display and visual merchandising, e. Professional associations provide information about visual merchandising and offer training.

The British Display Society BDS represents the visual merchandising and display profession and aims to promote high standards in the occupations. ACE promotes 'commercial best practice in the cultural, heritage and visitor attraction sector by providing training and networking opportunities. There are also a number of independent visual merchandisers who run training on a consultancy basis.

For visual merchandisers who have started on the shop floor, it may be possible, with experience, to become a team or an area team leader or manager. Those seeking to work at higher levels may need to have drawing skills, with desirable computer-aided design CAD skills. The ability to communicate ideas and convey complex information in a way that can be easily understood is vital.

Planning and organisation skills with the ability to lead projects from design through to completion within tight deadlines are also essential. Promotion to head office creative and visual merchandising teams may be a possibility. Head office career structures will vary from employer to employer but could include senior, director or international roles if the company is multinational.

Some experienced visual merchandisers may choose to become self-employed. They may freelance for a client base that they have built up, or work in a training or consultancy capacity with other retailers.

Experienced visual merchandisers may also find freelance project work within the events or cultural sectors. Talented visual merchandisers may find they can transfer their skills to careers in styling, prop-making, interior design, exhibition design and work within the television and film industry. Jobs and work experience Postgraduate study Careers advice Applying for university.

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Getting a job CVs and cover letters Applying for jobs Interview tips Open days and events Applying for university Choosing a course Getting into university Student loans and finance University life Changing or leaving your course Alternatives to university Post a job. View all retail vacancies. A flair for fashion or brands and the understanding of how to present an easy-to-buy look to customers is the basis of a visual merchandiser's skillset As a visual merchandiser, you'll develop, deliver and communicate visual concepts and strategies to promote retail brands, products and services in-store, in catalogues or online.

Responsibilities The type of activities you'll undertake will depend on your employer and your level of seniority. In general, activities may include some or all of the following: Income figures are intended as a guide only. Working hours Working hours are typically 35 to 40 hours across the whole week. Many roles are full time, but part-time hours may be available. These head office visual merchandising designers may visit stores out in the field to convey their design ideas to in-store visual merchandising teams and to ensure the concepts fit with the physical environment of the store.

Freelance or consultancy work is common, with freelance visual merchandisers working with a client base of smaller or independent retailers to create displays or train staff. There may also be opportunities within specialist visual merchandising installation and prop-making companies, to which large organisations often outsource projects. Many large retailers have head office-based roles in major cities in the UK, with field teams visiting stores in geographical regions, or store-based visual merchandising teams.

Some employers may require the role to be multifunctional, with responsibility for store layout design or buying, and sometimes on a lower level, selling.

The job can be very physical with lots of lifting and carrying, climbing of ladders and use of power tools. Subsequently, good levels of stamina and manual dexterity are useful. If based within a head office or field team it may be a requirement to visit stores in the field, which means time spent away from home. Some larger retailers with stores abroad may provide opportunities for international travel to ensure the consistency of the brand across European or worldwide branches. A driving licence may be required.

Qualifications You don't need to be a graduate to enter this profession, but some higher education institutions offer awards specific to the occupation.

This includes courses such as: Other useful degree subjects include: It is important to bear in mind that pay rates for Apprenticeships do vary from area to area and between industry sectors. There is no maximum age to begin this career. Previous experience in design or retail will be an advantage. Full or part-time Access courses may available for candidates who do not have the qualifications for degree courses. Training depends on the employer and can combine on-the-job training with long or short internal or external courses.

The Chartered Society of Designers offers a Continuing Professional Development scheme to help members keep their knowledge and skills up to date. Freelance display designers or visual merchandisers have to fund their own training and development. Promotion opportunities depend on the size of the employer's business, but there may be opportunities to progress to supervisor, head designer or merchandiser, and sometimes to department manager.

Experienced display designers and visual merchandisers may become self-employed by moving into freelance work or setting up their own business. They progress by increasing their client base and building their businesses. Exhibition designers are responsible for the design and layout of shows and exhibitions. Graphic designers work to bring many kinds of communication alive.

They produce designs that get their clients' messages across with high visual impact. The role demands a keen business sense as well as creative flair. View People View Companies Some design expensive one-off pieces. Others work in a team creating a whole range of mass-produced fashions, or specialise in particular areas such as sportswear. Job Description, salaries and benefits Display designers and visual merchandisers use their design skills to promote the image, products and services of businesses and other organisations.

Display designers focus on designing displays, stands and panels for exhibitions, conferences and other events. They also produce point-of-sale displays, which are installed in hundreds of retail outlets. The work involves researching to get an understanding of what is needed, and coming up with design ideas. Visual merchandisers also source elements such as lighting, props and accessories.

It is important to make the most of the space available, work within a budget and meet deadlines. Installing and dismantling displays may also be part of the job description. A display designer or visual merchandiser should: Experienced display designers and visual merchandisers sometimes move into self-employment.

What is the work like? Their tasks can include: Hours and environment Display designers and visual merchandisers usually work between 35 and 40 hours a week. Designing and arranging displays can involve standing, lifting, carrying and using ladders. Salary and other benefits These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live. Skills and personal qualities A display designer or visual merchandiser should: Interests It is important to: Getting in Employers include the design departments of large organisations, design consultancies, display companies, printers, exhibition contractors and retailers.

Entry for young people There are no specific qualifications to begin this career, but most employers look for a qualification in an art and design-related subject. Some people enter this career though Apprenticeships. Entry for adults There is no maximum age to begin this career. Training Training depends on the employer and can combine on-the-job training with long or short internal or external courses.

Getting on Promotion opportunities depend on the size of the employer's business, but there may be opportunities to progress to supervisor, head designer or merchandiser, and sometimes to department manager. Working overseas is a possibility for people working for multinational companies. Exhibition Designer Exhibition designers are responsible for the design and layout of shows and exhibitions.

What does the role of merchandiser involve?

This Visual Merchandiser job description template is optimized for posting on online job boards or careers pages and is easy to customize for your company.. Visual Merchandiser Responsibilities. Include: Defining, designing and implementing a creative visual merchandising strategy; Creating appealing and eye-catching visual displays that lead the customer through the entire store. Job Description, salaries and benefits Display designers and visual merchandisers use their design skills to promote the image, products and services of businesses and other organisations. Display designers focus on designing displays, stands and panels for exhibitions, conferences and other events. Visual merchandiser: Job description and activities A visual merchandiser creates window and in-store displays in shops and department stores, taking responsibility for ‘the look’ of the store, with the aim of promoting goods in order to maximise sales.